domestic violence and abuse

Domestic abuse and violence

1 in 7 reported crimes are domestic abuse related.

Get the advice you need to protect yourself, your family, your home, your job.

Overview

 

Domestic abuse and violence is increasing, the latest office of national statistics figures highlight that:

  • There are an estimated 2.4 million domestic violence related incidents every year. 

  • 14% of men and 28% of women have experienced domestic abuse in their lifetime.

  • 1.3 million domestic abuse related incidents were reported to the police last year.

  • 1 in 7 reported crimes are domestic abuse related.

  • Recorded domestic related crimes are up 24% from last year.

  • 1 in 5 people are victims of domestic abuse in their lifetime.

  • 1 in 4 victims of reported domestic related crimes are men.

 

What is domestic abuse?

Domestic violence and abuse is defined as:

 

Any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been intimate partners or family members, regardless of gender or sexuality. This can encompass, but is not limited to, the following types of abuse: psychological, physical, sexual, financial and emotional.

Domestic abuse offences are regarded as particularly serious within the criminal justice system. Domestic abuse is likely to become increasingly frequent and more serious the longer it continues, therefore the police prioritise domestic violence cases at an early stage to avoid escalation.

 

Domestic abuse can inflict lasting trauma on victims and their extended families, especially children and young people who either witness the abuse or are aware of it having occurred. Domestic abuse is rarely a one-off incident and it is the cumulative and interlinked physical, psychological, sexual, emotional or financial abuse that has a particularly damaging effect on the victims and those around them.

The domestic context of offences makes the offending more serious because it represents a violation of the trust and security that normally exists between people in an intimate or family relationship.

Domestic incidents often include elements of different offences, for specific guidance please see my sections on assault, criminal damageharassment and stalkingcontrolling or coercive behaviourthreats to kill, breach of protective order, social media offences and public order offences.

A mere allegation of domestic abuse or violence can be enough to result in arrest or a voluntary interview, this can lead to restrictive bail conditions, a charge and a court case.

Police investigations and Court hearings can have a dramatic impact on day to day living. Access to the family home and to children is often restricted and any caution or conviction can affect employment as it would remain on the police national computer and may be disclosed on a DBS check.

If you are suspected of domestic abuse I understand what you are going through, I know how much you can lose and how important it is to make the right decisions to protect yourself.

Whatever your circumstances I can help, my aim is to get you the best possible outcome so you can get on with you life again.​ I am on your side when you need help the most. 

Good legal advice is essential at an early stage, contact me or email me richard@defencesolicitor.net.

Loopholes to consider

Below I have outlined this area of law and defences.

 

Loopholes are legitimate lines of defence that take into account all the small areas of law.

Loophole defences that may be appropriate to domestic abuse and violence may include:

  1. Can it be proven that you actually took part in the conduct alleged?

  2. Do you have an alibi to prove you did not take part in the alleged behaviour?

  3. Can you demonstrate that your partner is lying or exaggerating the allegation? 

  4. Will your partner actually come to Court to give evidence against you?

  5. Without your partner can the prosecution prove their case?

  6. Can you make a counter claim against your partner?

  7. Can you demonstrate that your actions were reasonable in all the circumstances?

  8. Are the incidents within time for a summary offence to be proceeded with? 

  9. Do you have witnesses to help prove your account?

  10. Do you have other evidence to help prove your account? 

 

Good legal advice is essential at an early stage, contact me or email me richard@defencesolicitor.net.

Contact me today to discuss your case

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London, UK

email: richard@defencesolicitor.net

www.defencesolicitor.net 

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​​​​© Richard Bayliss Freelance Solicitor 2021